Chan Kam Lee

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Chan Kam Lee 李陈金 (Pinyin: Lǐ chén jīn) was a Taoist herbalist and teacher of Tai Chi and Qigong who was born in Weihaiwei in Shandong in China around 1874. Chan Kam Lee traded in gemstones between Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore and London where he eventually settled down and opened up offices in Holborn in 1930. He also established the first Taoist Arts school in the West in London in 1930, a private class for himself and a few friends and their families to train in the Taoist Cultural Arts.

Here is a series of quotes from Chee Soo referring to his master Chan Kam Lee.

A step by step guide to Kung Fu (1974) paperback

He (Chee Soo) became President of the International Wu Shu association - the only martial arts organization in the world recognised by the Peking experts - after the death of Chan Kam Lee in 1957.

This remarkable 54-year-old man was born in London, but a chance meeting with an old Chinese, Chan Lee, radically changed his life.

Chan Lee was a master of herbal therapy and Kung Fu. He taught the young Chee Soo the secrets of the ancient Chinese arts - secrets that have been passed down in this way for at least 5,000 years.[1]


Most of the famous Chinese masters of old only passed on their knowledge to pupils who had proved themselves to be diligent, loyal, and hardworking. My master, Chan Lee, was no exception. His principles were impressed on me to such an extent that I felt extremely reluctant to pass on this knowledge until a pupil proved himself worthy - let alone publish it in such a way that it is available to anyone who cares to read it. [2]


...you should always try to emulate the true spirit of the Chinese knights, and strictly adhere to the code of honour of the Wu Shu Association as laid down by Chan Lee, Kau Sau (Professor).

In 1951 he made the eight golden rules which we practise, live by, and try to uphold at all times. These are:

  1. Lead a clean life both in mind and body.
  2. Obey your instructor at all times and without question.
  3. Control your mind first, your spirit second, and your body third.
  4. Before you try to understand other people, you must fully understand yourself.
  5. Never use physical strength under any circumstances. Learn to acquire and use your inner power.
  6. Always practise with a feeling of exhilaration, but be sure that you practise hard and diligently.
  7. Only use the Chinese self defence arts when you are in personal danger, and at all times if trouble confronts you, use every effort to settle the matter peacefully. If that fails, then, and only then, should you use your arts - in which case they will be your last resort.
  8. Follow the example set by your master, and at all times uphold the honour and dignity of the International Wu Shu Association.[3]


But over the years, something that has always stood out in my mind was a demonstration given by my master, Chan Lee. A lighted candle would be stood on a tall object- such as a table- and this would be placed a few inches from a brick wall.

My master would then place himself on the other side of the wall opposite the candle, and throw a punch at the wall, stopping his fist a quarter-of-an-inch away from the brickwork.

The tremendous force of inner power that he generated flowed through his body and down his arm, emanated from the front of his fist, penetrated through the wall, and snuffed out the flame of the candle.

You might think that perhaps some trickery was involved, but I can personally guarantee that it was absolutely authentic, especially as I held that lighted candle in my hands on a number of occasions when this demonstration was given.[4]




The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan (1976) hardback

It was from Chan Lee of the Lee family of Wei Hei Wei that I learned the T'ai Chi Ch'uan. The family has practised the Chinese martial arts for 3,000 years, fathers having instructed their sons, who in turn have instructed their own sons, and so on. Chan Lee, having no family of his own, honoured me by making me the recipient of his knowledge and experience. It is for this reason that the terminology used in this book is the old form, based on the names of the animals whose postures the various stances represent, rather than the later form, under which picturesque names such as "drive the tiger back to the mountain" and "the crane stands on one leg" are used. [5]


It is regrettable that in a volume of this size it is not possible to include the whole sequence of movements that comprise the "form" of the T'ai Chi Sword (Tao). These were originally laid down by the Taoists and Chan Lee, my master, taught them to me.[6]

Tc.jpg

The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2003 reproduced with permission



The Chinese Art of K'ai men (1977) hardback

...Ch'ang Ming (Taoist long-life therapy) came into being. It is still carried on today, thanks to the work of the Lee family over the last few thousand years, and particularly to Chan Lee, who showed how the therapy could be adapted to Western eating habits.[7]


All the Taoist Arts, such as Taoism, Taoist Yoga (K'ai Men), Taoist Philosophy, Taoist Healing, Taoist Meditation, and T'ai Chi Ch'uan and other accompanying arts were first introduced into England by a Chinese businessman, Professor Chan Lee, who in 1930 started the first club in London for those who wished to learn the Arts. Because of the war the club had to close in 1939, but re-opened again in 1950 and shortly afterwards a second club was started in East London.

Stringent grading rules were laid down in 1951, and the Chinese Cultural Arts Association was formed so that all clubs and practitioners would be together under one banner. This has proved very successful, and many associated clubs have been formed, both in Britain and overseas.

Professor Chan Lee died in the winter of 1953-4, and it was natural that his nephew, Chee Soo, who had trained with him from the age of fourteen, should take over the leadership of the organization.[8]

Km.jpg

The Taoist Art of K'ai Men

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2006 (reproduced with permission)



Brian Hayes Show LBC radio interview 1977

Chee Soo: It's rather curious, by a very strange coincidence, probably another Chinese fairy tale really. When I left Doctor Barnardo homes at fourteen years of age I became a page boy in Earl's Court in a nursing home, and I used to go over to Hyde Park and have a kick around on my day off on Sundays, and I happened to be playing with my ball when my ball actually hit the back of the head of a gentleman sitting on a park bench.

Interviewer: Who was doing these gentle movements.

Chee Soo: No he was sitting there, just sitting there very quietly, and I went over to retrieve my ball, and I came up to the front of him to apologize, and I saw he was Chinese, and we got talking and he was an importer/exporter, very much alone he had no family, and I was of course actually an orphan and having no family of my own, and the friendship gradually grew and grew, and till eventually in actual fact after many meetings he invited me to his club in Holborn, Red Lion Square, which he had a little club meeting three or four times a week, and from then on I practiced under him almost continuously.

Interviewer: And I suppose like all the Oriental Arts it has a very, very long history.

Chee Soo: Oh yes, the particular style that Chan Lee practiced and him and his family go back three or four thousand years BC.




The Tao of Long Life (1979) hardback

Nearly sixty years ago, Chan Kam Lee, in all his illustrious wisdom, allied the Taoist rules and recommendations to foods and drinks normally consumed in the West, and, by balancing the Yin and Yang intake, came up with the following suggestions: [9]

You may be interested to know that this Association was originally formed in 1934 on the foundations that were laid down by Professor Chan Kam Lee who started the first Chinese Taoist Arts School in London in 1930.

Professor Lee died in the winter of 1953-4, when his boat sank in a storm off the coast of China, and it was then that his nephew Chee Soo was asked to take over the Presidency of the Association.

...They are the only Taoist Associations in the world and are trying to keep up the traditions laid down by Professor Chan Lee and his family.[10]


The Tao of Long Life (1982) paperback

Nearly sixty years ago, Chan Kam Lee, in all his illustrious wisdom, allied the Taoist rules and recommendations to foods and drinks normally consumed in the West, and, by balancing the Yin and Yang intake, came up with the following suggestions: [11]


You may be interested to know that this Society was formed on the foundations that were originally laid down by Professor Chan Kam Lee, who started the first Chinese Taoist Arts School in London in 1930.

Professor Lee died in the winter of 1953-4, when his boat sank in a storm off the coast of China, and it was then that his nephew Chee Soo was asked to take over the Presidency of all the Taoist Arts that were being taught. [12]

TOLL.jpg

The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission


Taoist Yoga (1983) paperback

As a result of this fantastic dedication to experiment, it was found how to attain a perfect balance in one's eating habits, and as a result Ch'ang Ming (Taoist long-life therapy) came into being. It is still carried on today, thanks to the work of the Lee family over the last few thousand years, and particularly to Chan Lee, who showed how the therapy could be adapted to Western eating habits.[13]


All the Taoist arts, such as Taoism, Taoist Yoga (K'ai Men), Taoist Philosophy, Taoist Healing, Taoist Meditation, and T'ai Chi Ch'uan and other accompanying arts were first introduced into England by a Chinese businessman, Professor Chan Lee, who in 1930 started the first club in London for those who wished to learn about these Arts. Because of the war the club had to close in 1939, but it re-opened again in 1950 and shortly afterwards a second club was started in East London.

Stringent grading rules were laid down in 1951, and the Chinese Cultural Arts Association was formed so that all clubs and practitioners would be together under one banner. This has proved very successful, and many associated clubs have been formed, both in Britain and overseas.

Professor Chan Lee died in the winter of 1953-4, and it was natural that his nephew, Chee Soo, who had trained with him from the age of fourteen, should take over the leadership of the organization.[14]

Km.jpg

The Taoist Art of K'ai Men

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2006 (reproduced with permission)



The Taoist Art of Feng Shou (1983) paperback

Our own master, Chan Kam Lee, the founder of the International Wu-Shu Association, was no exception, and his principles were impressed upon us to such a degree that we have been reluctant to pass on further knowledge until a pupil had proved himself truly worthy. [15]

In fact, the knowledge of the art of 'Feng Shou' goes back at least 2,000 years, and has been handed down through the Lee family for all this time, and has been passed to us by our late master, Chan Kam Lee. Add the modesty and the humility that are impressed upon every Chinese child, and the philosophy that is inbred in his daily life, and you can perhaps understand why so few records were ever kept.[16]


At all times the student must try to emulate the true spirit of the Knights of ancient China, and strictly adhere to the code of honour of the Taoist Cultural Arts Association that was originally laid down by the Lee family, and brought to us by Chan Kam Lee. In 1931 Chan Kam Lee formulated the eight golden rules that we live by, practise, and endeavour to uphold at all times, and these are:

  1. Lead a clean and pure life in mind, body and spirit, and always follow the WAY of the TAO.
  2. Obey your instructor at all times and do so without question.
  3. Control your mind first, your spirit second, and your body third.
  4. Before you try to understand other people, first learn to understand yourself fully.
  5. Never use physical strength under any circumstances. Learn to acquire and utilize your Inner Power.
  6. Always practise with a feeling of exhilaration, but ensure that you practise hard and diligently.
  7. The Chinese self-defence arts must only be used when you are in personal danger, or if you should see someone else in danger. At all times, if trouble confronts you, use every effort to settle the matter peaceably. If that fails, then, and only then, should you use the arts, but in any case, they should be used only as the very last resort.
  8. Follow the example as set by your own master, and at all times uphold the honour, dignity, and the good name of the International Wu Shu Association.[17]


Firstly, the techniques of kicking were part of the sequences handed down through the Lee family and passed to us by our most respected master Chan Kam Lee. [18]


No other kung fu system in the world incorporates this unique system of training, for it was devised by myself from the basis of the Three Star Principle (San Hsing Kang Ling) laid down by the Lee family, and passed to us from Chan Kam Lee. [19]


Over the years, one wonderful experience has always stood out in my memory. It is a particular demonstration given sometimes by my master, Chan Kam Lee. A lighted candle would be placed on a tall object — such as a table — and this would be positioned a few inches away from a brick wall. My master would then go to the other side of the wall, opposite the candle, and throw a punch at the wall, stopping his fist a short distance from the brickwork. The tremendous force of Inner Power that he generated flowed through his body and down his arm, came out from the front of his fist, penetrated through the wall, and snuffed out the flame of that candle.

You might think that perhaps a trick was involved, but I can personally guarantee that it was absolutely authentic: on a number of occasions I held that lighted candle in my hands myself when this demonstration was given.[20]


The history of the Taoist arts within the Lee family goes back over 2,000 years in the town of Wei Hei Wei, on the coast of Central China, about 200 miles from Beijing. The Lee family kept the Taoist arts completely within their own family group for all these years, handing them down from father to son and daughter in an unbroken chain until the early 1930s when Chan Kam Lee, a business man and a native of mainland China, became the last in line of the family to inherit this style. Chan Kam Lee, was an importer and exporter of precious and semi-precious stones, and therefore had quite a lot of travelling to do especially between Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore and England. Eventually, he set up his main office in London, and in 1930, to find an outlet for his physical, mental and spiritual needs, he opened a small select club in a schoolroom in Red Lion Square, Holborn, Central London, catering for his personal friends and their sons. The total number of students never exceeded a dozen, and as most of them travelled in the course of their business the average attendance was only about six members.

Chee Soo was born of a Chinese father and an English mother, and as they died when he was only a child, he was brought up by Dr Barnardo's Homes, which is a charitable orphanage. He started his first job as a pageboy in a nursing home in Earl's Court, West London, and he used to go to Hyde Park in his spare time to enjoy the air in the park, watch the horse riders, and to play with his ball, whenever the weather permitted. One Sunday, his ball accidentally hit the back of an old gentleman who was sitting on a park bench. After he had recovered his ball, Chee Soo went up to the gentleman to apologize, only to see that the man was also Chinese. As it was a very rare thing to see another Chinese person in London in those days, the two began to talk together, and arranged to meet again. Whenever the opportunity permitted, the two began to meet regularly and a strong friendship developed between Chee Soo, and the gentleman who was Chan Kam Lee.

In the summer of 1934, Chee Soo was invited to Chan Lee's club, and that is how Chee Soo came to take up the vast range of Taoist martial, philosophical, healing and the cultural arts. In 1939 Chee Soo fought in the war as a Tank Commander in the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Tank Regiment in France, North Africa and Burma, where he was captured by the Japanese. Three years later he finally managed to escape into the Shan Mountains, West Burma, and after a month on the run, threading his way through dense jungle and over the mountains, he eventually made contact with the allies again.

In 1950, Chee Soo, with Chan Lee's permission, formed his own club in Manor Road School, West Ham, East London, where he was living at the time.

The International Wu Shu Association

After the second world war the Association came to be known as the British Wu Shu Association, to cater for the needs of the many members who started to form their own clubs, and Chan Lee set down the association's grading syllabus, so that the same standard of proficiency was maintained in all the clubs.

In the winter of 1953/54 Chan Lee died off the coast of China near Canton, when his ship sank in a severe storm, and and so it came to be that Chee Soo was asked to take over the leadership of the Association. However, in memory of Chan Lee, Chee Soo turned down any title within the Association at that time. [21]

Fs.jpg

The Taoist Art of Feng Shou Hand of the Wind kung fu

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2006 reproduced with permission



The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan (1984) paperback

The history of T'ai Chi Ch'uan

As it was a family group and they practised together, it was natural that the parents instructed their children, who in turn taught their own children, and so on. Thus it came about that the last three children, one daughter and two sons, had the responsibility of keeping the arts alive. In fact only one son did so, and his name was Chan Kam Lee, the eldest of the three children.

Chan Lee, an unmarried businessman dealing in precious and semi-precious stones, finally opened a small office in the Holborn district of London, which in those days was the world centre of this trade. In 1933 he started a small class in Red Lion Square, Holborn, to keep himself fit and to benefit a few selected close friends.

I was playing in Hyde Park with my ball one Sunday afternoon in 1934, and I remember that my ball accidentally hit the back of an elderly gentleman who was sitting on a park bench. Offering my sincere apologies to him, we noticed that both of us were Chinese, and we immediately started talking to one another, since it was a rarity to see another Chinese in London in those days. A bond of friendship immediately sprang up between the two of us, and I was eventually invited to join his little group in Holborn.

In the winter of 1953/4 Chan Kam Lee died in a severe storm off the coast of China near Canton, and eventually I was asked to take over as Chief Instructor and President of the Association. [22]


Yin and Yang

As a result of this fantastic dedication they found the way to attain a perfect balance in their eating habits, and as a result Ch'ang Ming (Taoist Good Health and Long Life Therapy) came into being. It is still being carried on today, thanks to the work of the Lee family over the last few thousand years, and particularly to Chan Lee, who showed how the Taoist Ch'ang Ming could be adapted to Western eating habits.[23]


International Taoist Society

You may be interested to know that this Society is based on the foundations that were originally laid down by Professor Chan Kam Lee, who started the first Chinese Taoist Arts School in London in 1930.

Chan Lee died in the winter of 1953-4, when his boat sank in a fierce storm off the coast of China, and it was then that his nephew Chee Soo was asked to take over the Presidency of all the Taoist Arts that were being taught. [24]

Tc.jpg

The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2003 reproduced with permission



The Taoist Ways of Healing (1986) paperback

Chan Kam Lee

Chan Kam Lee was the last in line of the Lee family, and as he was an importer and exporter of precious and semi-precious stones, he travelled thousands of miles promoting his business, which was mainly between Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore and England. After he had built up a stable business he finally set up his main office in London, and from there he did most of his trade.

After a while Chan Kam Lee began to get restless, and he sought an outlet for his physical, mental and spiritual needs. As a result, he established a small and select class in a schoolroom in Red Lion Square, near Holborn, in Central London, teaching and practising his Chinese Taoist arts. He catered only for his own personal friends and their sons, so the total number of his students was very small,and at the most there were only a dozen people attending. All of them were in business and travelled quite a lot, so the average attendance at any one time was only in the region of six people. However, this did not deter Chan Lee for he was able to keep up his own practice as well, which was the main objective in the first place, so he was very happy.

Chee Soo

Chee Soo was born of a Chinese father and an English mother, and as they died when he was only a very young child, he was brought up in a Dr Barnardo's home, which was and still is a charitable orphanage. He started his first job, as a page-boy in a nursing home in Earls Court, West London, and in his spare time he used to go to Hyde Park to enjoy the fresh air, watch the horse riders exercising their animals, and to play with his ball.

However, something happened that was to alter the whole course of his future life. One Sunday afternoon, he went to the park to play with his ball, when suddenly it bounced rather erratically, and accidentally hit the back of an elderly gentleman who was sitting on a park bench. Having recovered his ball, he went up to the gentleman to offer his apologies, only to see that the man was also Chinese. As it was a very rare thing to see another Chinese in London in those days, they began to talk together, and even arranged to meet again. So the two began to meet fairly regularly — whenever the opportunity and the weather permitted, and a very strong friendship developed between Chee Soo and the gentleman, who was Chan Kam Lee.

In the summer of 1934, Chee Soo was invited to Chan Lee's class, and that was the beginning of the training that he has maintained ever since, and it was surely the ordained way of the Tao that enabled Chee Soo to start his learning of the vast range of the Taoist martial, philosophical, healing and cultural arts in this way.

It gave great happiness to Chan Lee for he had no family of his own, and as he earnestly desired to keep the Taoist arts alive, he adopted Chee Soo as a nephew, and taught him the arts whenever his work and time permitted. For Chee Soo it meant that the he had someone on whom he could rely, and to advise him, and teach him the fundamentals of the Taoist philosophical attitude to life and all that it meant.[25]


He managed to make contact with Chan Lee again after the war was finished, and the class in Holborn was restarted. In 1950, Chee Soo, with Chan Lee's permission, formed his own class in Manor Road School, West Ham, East London. The Formation of the International Taoist Society This society was formed on the foundations that were originally laid down by Professor Chan Kam Lee to cater for the interest that was beginning to be aroused, and because other members started to form their own classes and clubs, and it was felt that the formation of an association would help to bind all practitioners together.

In the winter of 1953-4, Chan Lee died, off the coast of China, near Canton, when the ship that he was travelling in sank in a severe storm, and so Chee Soo was asked to take over the leadership of the Association. However, in deference to the memory of Chan Lee, Chee Soo declined to accept any title within the Association at that particular time.[26]


Needless to say, all our associations strictly maintain the traditions and rules that were laid down by Profesor Chan Kam Lee and his family; and our President, Professor Chee Soo, who naturally, is also a Taoist, has dedicated his whole life in serving and helping others whenever he can.[27]

TWOH.jpg

Taoist Ways of Healing - The Chinese Art of Pa Chin Hsien

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2012 reproduced with permission



Article in Chalice magazine 1992

How did you become involved with Taoism and its Arts? Well, my father was a Chinese seaman and my mother English. My father died at sea when I was very young and my mother became seriously ill, so I ended up in a Dr. Barnardo's Home, she subsequently died in Norwich without my knowledge at the time, so I grew up in the Barnardo's Institution.

One day, when playing with a football in Hyde Park, my ball hit an elderly gentleman on the back, on retrieving the ball, I noticed he was 'Oriental' and he noticed I had similar features. To meet another 'Chinese' in England in the early 1930's was an unusual occurrence. So we started talking and became firm friends. It turned out that he was a Taoist exile, having escaped from 'war-torn' China, being the only surviving member of his family.

He eventually adopted me and taught me all the Taoist philosophy and arts, which I have lived by ever since.

References

  1. A step by step guide to Kung Fu by Chee Soo. published by Hudson-Parke publishing 1974 - page 2.
  2. A step by step guide to Kung Fu by Chee Soo. published by Hudson-Parke publishing 1974 - page 4.
  3. A step by step guide to Kung Fu by Chee Soo. published by Hudson-Parke publishing 1974 - page 92.
  4. A step by step guide to Kung Fu by Chee Soo. published by Hudson-Parke publishing 1974 - page 94.
  5. The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan by Chee Soo published by Gordon & Cremonesi Ltd 1976 ISBN 0860330370 - page 11
  6. The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan by Chee Soo published by Gordon & Cremonesi Ltd 1976 ISBN 0860330370 - page 39
  7. The Chinese Art of K'ai Men by Chee Soo published by Gordon & Cremonesi Ltd 1977 ISBN 0860330532 - page 33
  8. The Chinese Art of K'ai Men by Chee Soo published by Gordon & Cremonesi Ltd 1977 ISBN 0860330532 - page 161
  9. The Tao of Long Life by Chee Soo published by Gordon & Cremonesi Ltd 1979 ISBN 0860330680 - page 120
  10. The Tao of Long Life by Chee Soo published by Gordon & Cremonesi Ltd 1979 ISBN 0860330680 - page 164
  11. The Tao of Long Life by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1982 ISBN 0850303206 - page 120
  12. The Tao of Long Life by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1982 ISBN 0850303206 - page 164
  13. Taoist Yoga by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303230 - page 33
  14. Taoist Yoga by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303230 - page 158
  15. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 8
  16. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 13
  17. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 23
  18. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 72
  19. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 130
  20. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 224
  21. The Taoist Art of Feng Shou by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1983 ISBN 0850303605 - page 231-2
  22. The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1984 ISBN 0850303877 - page 15
  23. The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1984 ISBN 0850303877 - page 28
  24. The Chinese Art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1984 ISBN 0850303877 - page 157
  25. The Taoist Ways of Healing by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1986 ISBN 085030475X - page 137-8
  26. The Taoist Ways of Healing by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1986 ISBN 085030475X - page 139
  27. The Taoist Ways of Healing by Chee Soo published by Aquarian Press (Thorsons publishing group) 1986 ISBN 085030475X - page 140