Difference between revisions of "Huang Ti"

From Seahorse
Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his dea...")
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 +
{{Infobox Chinese emperor
 +
|image = [[Image:Yellow Emperor.jpg|center|Yellow emperor]]
 +
|name = Yellow emperor
 +
|ances-name = [[Gongsun|Gōngsūn]] (公孫)<ref name="iFengan">iFeng.com. "[http://big5.ifeng.com/gate/big5/phtv.ifeng.com/program/qysf/lszl/200706/0608_1730_132272.shtml iFeng.com]." ''史記 五帝本紀 not publicly modifiable version of Record of Grand historian, section regarding three sovereigns and five emperors.'' Retrieved on 2010-08-22.</ref>
 +
|clan-name =
 +
|given-name = Xuānyuán (軒轅)<ref name="iFengan" />
 +
|title1 = One of [[Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors]]
 +
|reign1 = 2696–2598 BCE <ref name="Ve">Veith, Ilza. [2002] (2002). The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine. University of California Press. ISBN 0520229363, 9780520229365. pg 5–6.</ref>
 +
|off-title1 = Yellow Emperor (黃帝)
 +
|title2 =
 +
|reign2 =
 +
|off-title2 =
 +
|temple-name = None.
 +
|post-name = None.
 +
|notes =
 +
}}
 +
{{Chinese
 +
|title=Huang di
 +
|pic=
 +
|t=黃帝
 +
|s=黄帝
 +
|l=Yellow Emperor
 +
|p=Huángdì
 +
|w=Huang<sup>2</sup> ti<sup>4</sup>
 +
|j=wong4 dai3
 +
|altname=Gongsun Xuanyuan
 +
|t2=公孫軒轅
 +
|s2=公孙轩辕
 +
|p2=gong1 sun1 xuan1 yuan2
 +
|j2=gung1 syun1 hin1 jyun4
 +
}}
 +
 
At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his death he was given the title of "The Divine Husbandman" (he is also credited with the invention of the plough and construction of the first wheeled cart, with devising various systems of irrigation, and with extending the arts of husbandry) and was chosen to be one of the gods of the apothecaries of China. He is probably best known for his classic of Chinese internal medicine, the Nei Ching, which to this day is widely consulted by physicians.
 
At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his death he was given the title of "The Divine Husbandman" (he is also credited with the invention of the plough and construction of the first wheeled cart, with devising various systems of irrigation, and with extending the arts of husbandry) and was chosen to be one of the gods of the apothecaries of China. He is probably best known for his classic of Chinese internal medicine, the Nei Ching, which to this day is widely consulted by physicians.

Revision as of 01:13, 22 February 2011

Template:Infobox Chinese emperor Template:Chinese

At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his death he was given the title of "The Divine Husbandman" (he is also credited with the invention of the plough and construction of the first wheeled cart, with devising various systems of irrigation, and with extending the arts of husbandry) and was chosen to be one of the gods of the apothecaries of China. He is probably best known for his classic of Chinese internal medicine, the Nei Ching, which to this day is widely consulted by physicians.