Difference between revisions of "Huang Ti"

From Seahorse
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[Image:Yellow Emperor.jpg|center|Yellow emperor]]
 
[[Image:Yellow Emperor.jpg|center|Yellow emperor]]
  
 +
The teachings of men such as the '''Yellow Emperor''', Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Moses, Jesus Christ, Mohammed and Buddha were originally based on the natural laws of the universe, but unfortunately other men have misinterpreted these teachings, obscured them by adding ritual and attire, and introduced numerous laws to compel attendance at churches and temples. In this way the original teachings have often been lost, distorted or destroyed, and there are few teachers and preachers today who have any real depth of spiritual understanding. Words, themselves often representing a later, weakened form of the original teaching, are recited with little care for their meaning, and few teachers live as close to the spiritual world as they should if they are to set a good example for others. Thus it is that religion has become remote and out of touch, so fewer people now attend the services or say their prayers.
 +
{{TOLL}} Introduction page 23
 +
 +
==Herbs fo Health==
 
At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his death he was given the title of "The Divine Husbandman" (he is also credited with the invention of the plough and construction of the first wheeled cart, with devising various systems of irrigation, and with extending the arts of husbandry) and was chosen to be one of the gods of the apothecaries of China. He is probably best known for his classic of Chinese internal medicine, the [[Nei Ching]], which to this day is widely consulted by physicians.
 
At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his death he was given the title of "The Divine Husbandman" (he is also credited with the invention of the plough and construction of the first wheeled cart, with devising various systems of irrigation, and with extending the arts of husbandry) and was chosen to be one of the gods of the apothecaries of China. He is probably best known for his classic of Chinese internal medicine, the [[Nei Ching]], which to this day is widely consulted by physicians.
 
It was [[Shen Nung]], however, later more popularly known as [[Huang Ti]] ([[The Yellow Emperor]]), the second emperor of China, who is said to have been the first to tabulate the useful and harmful properties of hundreds of herbs.<br>
 
It was [[Shen Nung]], however, later more popularly known as [[Huang Ti]] ([[The Yellow Emperor]]), the second emperor of China, who is said to have been the first to tabulate the useful and harmful properties of hundreds of herbs.<br>
{{TOLL}}
+
{{TOLL}} Chapter 11 page 133
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 
[[Category:Chinese Medicine]][[Category:Herbal therapy]]
 
[[Category:Chinese Medicine]][[Category:Herbal therapy]]

Revision as of 21:07, 23 May 2021

Yellow emperor

The teachings of men such as the Yellow Emperor, Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Moses, Jesus Christ, Mohammed and Buddha were originally based on the natural laws of the universe, but unfortunately other men have misinterpreted these teachings, obscured them by adding ritual and attire, and introduced numerous laws to compel attendance at churches and temples. In this way the original teachings have often been lost, distorted or destroyed, and there are few teachers and preachers today who have any real depth of spiritual understanding. Words, themselves often representing a later, weakened form of the original teaching, are recited with little care for their meaning, and few teachers live as close to the spiritual world as they should if they are to set a good example for others. Thus it is that religion has become remote and out of touch, so fewer people now attend the services or say their prayers.

TOLL.jpg

The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission

Introduction page 23

Herbs fo Health

At around 3,000 BCE, Shen Nung, later known as Huang Ti (the Yellow Emperor), drew up a list of hundreds of herbs and specified their useful and harmful properties. After his death he was given the title of "The Divine Husbandman" (he is also credited with the invention of the plough and construction of the first wheeled cart, with devising various systems of irrigation, and with extending the arts of husbandry) and was chosen to be one of the gods of the apothecaries of China. He is probably best known for his classic of Chinese internal medicine, the Nei Ching, which to this day is widely consulted by physicians. It was Shen Nung, however, later more popularly known as Huang Ti (The Yellow Emperor), the second emperor of China, who is said to have been the first to tabulate the useful and harmful properties of hundreds of herbs.

TOLL.jpg

The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission

Chapter 11 page 133