Difference between revisions of "Main Page"

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*[[Hsia Chen Pien]]- Acupuncture
 
 
*[[Kuanch'a Chentuan]] - Diagnosis by observation
 
*[[Kuanch'a Chentuan]] - Diagnosis by observation
 
*[[Ts'ao Yao]] - Herbal therapy
 
*[[Ts'ao Yao]] - Herbal therapy
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*[[I fou Shou]] - Sticky Hands
 
*[[I fou Shou]] - Sticky Hands
 
*[[Pa Fen Lei]] - The Eight Classifications
 
*[[Pa Fen Lei]] - The Eight Classifications
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*[[K'ai Men]]- Ch'i gung (Taoist Yoga)
  
 
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Revision as of 12:43, 25 February 2011

Welcome to the Seahorse Arts Mediawiki project
An Online Resource Base of articles about the Taoist Arts written by Chee Soo

Taichi.png T'ai Chi Ch'uan
Kaimen.png K'ai Men

Changming.png Chinese Medicine
Fengshou.png Feng Shou

Yinyang.png Taoism
Anmo.png Anmo

Picture of the day
Chee Soo practising T'ai Chi Chien

T'ai Chi Chien

T'ai Chi Sword makes full use of the combined techniques of Whirling Hands and Whirling Arms, but these are made more difficult by the weight and length of the sword. Greater mental concentration is required to retain complete control of the arms, wrists and hands, while maintaining perfect balance, especially in a few sequences where the whole body makes a complete whirl to demonstrate the 'order of the universe'. These techniques are not easy, but nothing is really easy in the full art of T'ai Chi, because there is so much to remember and so many movements have to be practised in order to understand the essence of energy and force, and expand self-awareness and mental control.

Seahorse Arts Mediawiki

The Seahorse Arts Mediawiki is an Online Resource Base for students training in the Lee style Taoist Arts. It consists of a collection of articles written by Chee Soo taken from over sixty years as a student and teacher dedicated to researching the philosophy of Taoism and it's practical application. The main categories include Taoist philosophy, Chinese Medicine in theory and practise, T'ai Chi Ch'uan, K'ai Men or Taoist chi gung, Tao Yin or breathing exercises, Feng Shou kung fu, and the many and various techniques of cultivation of the natural internal energy of the body the Chinese know as Chi. There is also an extensive body of knowledge surrounding the subject of Chinese Medicine including diagnosis and the application of the Taoist Health Arts such as Anmo Taoist massage, Tien Chen acupressure, Ts'ao Yao herbal remedies, Ch'ang Ming or Taoist macrobiotics and dietary therapy, thermogenesis, and Taoist alchemy with extensive and detailed information both from a historical perspective and as it is applied today.

Taoist Arts of the Lee Style
Featured article

I Fou Shou - The enlightened hand

I Fu Shou is a section of T'ai Chi that fascinates every practitioner of the art, and brings to light powers that everyone possesses but very few people realize they have. That is why in some parts of China, I Fu Shou is sometimes called the 'Enlightened Hand'.

I Fu Shou is an exercise in which two people participate. Each person tries to upset the balance of the other whilst maintaining their own stability. Contact is through the arms and hands throughout the exercise. No matter what stance is adopted, there may always be a weakness in the balance of the body whether one moves left or right, backward or forward, upward or downward, and it is by taking advantage of these six directional weaknesses that the participants in I Fu Shou try to 'uproot' each other — to cause the other to lose their footing. The most difficult way to do this is to lift the other off the ground, but even this may be achieved provided that one has practised diligently and developed a faultless technique.

Sensitivity

Without a doubt, uprooting your partner by lifting them completely off the ground is the summit of achievement in I Fu Shou, but it is the heightened sensitivity that you develop by being in constant touch with your partner that is the chief value of the exercise. Slowly, and through constant practise, you will be able to tell whether your opponent is at all tense, which of their feet is carrying the most weight, and which part of the foot is experiencing the greatest pressure. You must also estimate the degree of pressure and even the direction in which it is being applied. Thus there is a lot of sensitivity involved, and through your training you will eventually be able to judge your movements so that you can succeed in uprooting your partner.

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Taichi.png T'ai Chi Ch'uan
Kaimen.png K'ai Men

Changming.png Chinese Medicine
Fengshou.png Feng Shou

Yinyang.png Taoism
Anmo.png Anmo