Nei Ching

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Neijing - The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine (黄帝内经 Huángdì Nèijīng)

The sections of K'ai Men

Ch'i and Li healing, which utilize the natural energy of the body and the macro-cosmic energy of the universe, can be used in healing and helping others, through the lines of meridian. The principles are similar to those in acupuncture. The great difference is that, whereas acupuncture uses various sizes and lengths of needles, in Ch'i and Li healing the fingers and palms are used to cause the lines of meridian to vibrate and thereby transmit either Ch'i (internal) or Li (macro-cosmic) energy to the points of weakness within the patient. Whilst this may sound simple enough, it does require an ability to generate the various energies as and when and to the degree needed; a knowledge of how to read the pulse and of the principles of the Yin and Yang; a full appreciation of the harmony and opposition of the five elements; and an intimate knowledge of the lines of meridian as laid down in the Nei Ching (the internal medicine canon; see next chapter). To acquire the requisite ability and knowledge requires serious, concentrated study, over a long period. It requires too a first-class teacher (Chinese, ideally) to impart these skills.

Km.jpg

The Taoist Art of K'ai Men

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2006 (reproduced with permission)

Chapter 3 page 34

The Importance of Good Health

The Nei Ching (黄帝内经 Huángdì Nèijīng), which is reputed to have been written by the Yellow Emperor and to be the oldest medical book in existence, is the classic work on Chinese internal medicine, and it states that "Yin is active within and is a guardian of the Yang, whereas Yang is active on the outside and is the regulator of the Yin" — equating harmony of the Yin and Yang with health and constant youthfulness, and disharmony with ill health, disease or death.

Km.jpg

The Taoist Art of K'ai Men

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2006 (reproduced with permission)

Chapter 4 page 37


The five elements

The theory underlying this ancient trend of thought (five elements) is fully expressed in the Yellow Emperor's Classic of the Nei Ching {黄帝内经 Huángdì Nèijīng}(Internal Health), and proves without doubt that anything that has a beginning also has an end; and that the end is the commencement of something new, and that from a maximum point there must be a decline to a minimum level, and vice versa.

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The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission

chapter 3 page 35


The five viscera are the Yin organs of the body while the five bowel systems are the Yang organs. When only one organ has a weakness, this can be tackled in a straightforward manner (for instance, if the trouble is the heart, which is Yin, this can be dealt with through Yang foods and herbs). In other words, one kind of illness in an organ can be countered by the opposite influence. However, as the Nei Ching points out, if there are two Yin organs affected, then one Yang influence will not be enough to balance the good and the bad, so further steps have to be taken. This is where a thorough understanding of the harmony and opposition of the "Five Elements" is so essential to appreciate the depth of the Chinese arts in relation to the human body.

TOLL.jpg

The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission

chapter 3 page 41

Diagnosis by observation

The Nei Ching explains that if someone is ill and is suffering from a bout of fever, then the part of the face that turns red indicates which organ is affected, and is a directive where treatment should be directed.

  1. A red complexion indicates the heart.
  2. A red nose shows sickness of the spleen.
  3. Red on the left side of the jaw points to the liver being under duress.
  4. Red on the right side of the jaw signifies disease in the lungs.
  5. A red chin points to trouble in the kidneys.

In all these instances a very strong Yin influence is indicated and headaches, perspiration and even vomiting may be experienced.

TOLL.jpg

The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission

chapter 6 page 57

Study your own pulse

The Nei Ching, the Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine, specifies that the best time of the day to take the pulse is early in the morning, before the Yang part of the day has begun and the Yin section has started to fail, and before any food or drink had been consumed, before the twelve organs have become invigorated, and while the energy levels have not yet reached their peak or had been extended. The seasons too were said to influence the pulse to a considerable degree, and it was even recommended that the physician calculate the astrologically most favourable moment to take his patient's pulse. All this may seem to you very complicated, but it will convey the meticulous-ness of the ancient Chinese doctor in caring for his patients, and in seeking an absolute correct diagnosis.

TOLL.jpg

The Tao of Long Life - The Chinese Art of Ch'ang Ming

by Chee Soo

©Seahorse Books 2008 reproduced with permission

chapter 8 page 101

Wen Chiech'u - Thermogenesis

Recognition of the healing properties of heat goes back many thousands of years, as we already know, so a very firm basis had already been formulated before the Nei Ching had been written. It was an integral part of our ancient Chinese philosophy that if Yin was trapped inside, then it could only be released by Yang on the outside, and whenYin endeavours to work its way outward, then the balance can only be controlled by theYang being made to work its way inward.

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Taoist Ways of Healing - The Chinese Art of Pa Chin Hsien

by Chee Soo

Copyright ©Seahorse Books 2012 reproduced with permission

Chapter 7 page 60